Monthly Archives: July 2016

Painting Lotus Flowers

Painting Lotus Flowers
In this week’s Chinese Brush painting class our project will focus on painting lotus flowers. They are a very popular subject for artwork and a perfect flower for us to practice our brushstrokes. We will use the “wipe” stroke for the leaves and a modified orchid petal stroke for the flowers.

To paint this lovely flower load your brush with light pink then add a deeper pink or red to the tip. Paint a grass orchid flower stroke and add a second stroke next to it to widen the petal. This forms the central petal. Paint another petal next to it using one orchid petal stroke and then add a thinner stroke on the side to give the illusion that the petal is only partially visible. Continue adding petals at different angles until you have a nice cup shaped flower.

Next load your brush the ink and using “wipe” strokes begin painting a semi-circle. Clean your brush and load it with lighter ink. Paint the top part of the leaf using smaller “wipe” strokes; this helps give perspective. Add as many leaves as you like and vary the number of strokes to form larger/smaller leaves.

Paint a thick stem for the flower and the leaf using dark ink. Don’t worry if your stem is not straight, it is more realistic to have a curving stem. Add small dots of dark ink along the sides of the stems. When the leaves are dry add veins in dark ink using the tip of the brush.

While you are painting lotus flowers you might consider adding a secondary focal point to your composition. Unopened buds, insects (e.g. bees and dragonflies) and birds work especially well with flowers.

Until next time…keep those pencils sharp!

Kelli

Lemon Yellow

Lemon YellowOne of my favorite watercolor paint colors is lemon yellow. It is a cool color meaning it has no red in it. When mixed with either a cool (e.g. ultramarine) or warm blue (e.g. thalo blue) you can create a myriad of greens which are perfect for painting botanicals.

The lemon on the right is a study from my sketchbook. It is painted in gouache which is an opaque watercolor. I used lemon yellow (naturally!), Indian yellow, vermilion, and olive green. I used a #14 round brush because it holds plenty of water and paint. The water helps the color mingle about and helps me from over working a painting.

Since the color yellow reminds me of sunny days I’ll be spending more time experimenting in my sketchbook as the summer progresses. I’ll also be planning our projects for Fall classes. There will be a class on sketching so please check back for details for this class and others including dates and how to register.

Until next time…keep those pencils sharp!

Kelli

P.S. This lemon is the star of a new greeting card which is available in my shop.

Birthday Art

Plum Blossoms

PoppiesHubby’s birthday was this week and one of his presents was the Chinese Brush painting above. It is a modern interpretation of the classic plum blossom. I classify it as “modern” because the traditional plum blossom does not include leaves, it is just the branch and blossoms. I like the addition of the leaves because it complements the background paper and ties everything together. The bee adds a nice touch of whimsy.

The poppies on the right are from his birthday card. They were painted on mulberry paper then mounted onto card stock. They are fun to do because you don’t plan them they just happen as you move the brush on the paper.

Until next time…keep those pencils sharp!

Kelli