Monthly Archives: March 2015

Eggplant

Eggplant - AubergineIn this week’s drawing class, we will be discussing color theory and drawing an eggplant. It is no secret that there are hundreds of colors available for colored pencil work so why bother to learn color theory? Why not just buy the color you need? Even if you could find the perfect match you will most likely be disappointed in the results. Using a single color to render your subject will often result in a flat looking drawing. You need to mix in other colors to add vibrancy and realism to your work.

For example Prismacolor makes a color called black grape which is a great match for the local color of the eggplant on the right but, when used on its own it gets dull looking really quickly. To prevent this I added mulberry and black cherry to brighten up the lighter areas and goldenrod in the darker areas. Why goldenrod? If you consider the color wheel, goldenrod has yellow as its base and is opposite violet (also called its complement), when you mix them together they create a gray-brown color which gives depth to the shadows.

Don’t like using complementary colors in your artwork? Prefer analogous colors (colors next to each other on the color wheel)? Add some blue-violet or indigo blue to the shadows. Whichever method you choose remember in the case of colored pencils variety is best in achieving realism.

Until next time…keep those pencils sharp!

Kelli

Amur Leopard Cub

Amur Leopard Cub

My latest adventure with PanPastel continues the furry theme but this time my subject is a courageous little Amur leopard cub (Panthera pardus orientalis). All of those spots seemed challenging at first but by starting with black paper and adding color around the spots it made the task much easier. The initial stage of blocking in the main shapes goes fairly quickly with the PanPastels. This part is really important, it lets you see if your composition and proportions are correct. Once you know you have a good foundation then you can add the furry details. For my Amur leopard cub I used charcoal pencils in white and black. I used a combination of stipples and hatch marks to create the texture.

This cub was a lot of fun to work on. The tilt of his head, intent gaze, and long whiskers really give this little guy a lot of personality. I hope you’ll try drawing a leopard of your own. If you do, share a link to your work in the comments below.

Until next time…keep those pencils sharp!

Kelli

Pastel Panda

Pastel Panda

As I mentioned in last week’s post my next adventure with PanPastel would be drawing a panda. The process for creating this piece began just like the elephant with blocking in the major shapes to establish the overall form. Rather than using white paper I chose gray-toned pastel paper which helps the darks and bright whites pop off of the paper. The details were added using charcoal pencil, pastel pencil, and soft pastel. I really like the fuzzy cuddly texture of this guy. I hope you’ll visit again soon to see my next adventure with PanPastels.

Until next time…keep those pencils sharp!

Kelli

Elephant

Elephant

I have been experimenting with PanPastel colors and I have come to the conclusion that these are really fun to work with. I had heard about them a year ago but never tried them until now. I have been taking a class taught by Sharlena Wood on drawing wild animals using a more expressive technique and all of the blocking in is done with the PanPastels.

UnderpaintingThe elephant is my first finished project and I am really pleased with the result. The first step in creating my friendly elephant was to block in the color to get the general shape. As you can see from the underpainting on the right there isn’t any detail, only the shadows, midtones, and highlights have been established. Once that was done then the details could be added. All of the wrinkles were created by drawing meandering cross-hatched lines with charcoal and pastel pencils in different shades of gray. Some strategically spaced dots of white and black were added to give sparkle and additional depth.

My next project will be a panda. I hope you’ll come back soon to see how I did. Until then…keep those pencils sharp!

Kelli