Monthly Archives: June 2013

Zendala Dare #62

It seems like it has been ages since I participated in a Zendala Dare. All my other art projects have been keeping me busy but it is good to be tangling again. Be sure to check out this week’s template and give it a try yourself.

Zendala Dare #62

Happy Tangling!

Kelli

Purple Spotted Swallowtail

Purple Spotted Swallowtail
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Found in the rain forests of New Guinea at high elevations the male purple spotted swallowtail is a spectacular mix of pink and green spots. The idea for this painting came from my new butterfly book.

The wings of this butterfly are black and while many artists will say that using black paint lacks the depth of making your own black from green, red, and blue, I find I don’t get a rich enough hue. I prefer to build the color gradually using thin layers of black until I achieve the proper intensity.

Cheers!

Kelli

A Butterfly for the Summer Solstice

Black-veined White Butterfly
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Happy Midsummer everyone!

I’ve been having a bit of fun painting butterflies this week. This one is a Black-veined White (Aporia crataegi). They like to feed on plants in the Prunus genus (plums, cherries, peaches, nectarines).

Hope you have something fun planned for the official start to summer. This weekend we will also have a special astronomical treat – the largest supermoon of the year. Early Sunday morning the moon will be at its fullest and closest to Earth. So go have fun today (maybe do a dance with the butterflies) and then check out the supermoon on Sunday.

Cheers!

Kelli

Columbines

Columbine
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No matter what you call these flowers – Columbines, Aquilegia, or Granny’s Bonnets – one thing is certain these are exquisite. In addition to the trademark spurs and numerous brightly colored stamen, the central petals are framed by sepals that create a star effect. Their scientific name Aquilegia comes from the Latin word for eagle Aquila. If you look closely at the spurs they can resemble the talons of a bird of prey.

Columbines comes in a variety of colors – white, yellow, pink, blue, purple and some are even bi-colored. I chose a blue-violet color scheme for this painting so that I could highlight the bright yellow stamens. The flowers attract hummingbirds and butterflies so they would be a perfect addition to any garden.

Cheers!

Kelli